Recent Fire Damage Posts

How to Put Out an Electrical Fire at Home

5/29/2019 (Permalink)

Know the dangers of an electrical fire

An electrical fire in the home is often a more immediate danger than a wildfire and may lead to panic. The first thing to remember is that you need to stay calm. Then, follow these steps to put out an electrical fire at home.

Step One: Call the Fire Department

The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) advises that, in the event of a fire, the first thing a homeowner should do is call the fire department.

Yes, you can put out small fires by yourself, but there’s always a chance that you will fail. If you do, you want the fire department to already be on the way, so that they can put out the fire as quickly as possible.

In fact, even if you have put out an electrical fire, there is always a chance it could re-ignite. When they arrive, the firefighters will ensure that the fire is truly out and that your home is safe.

Step Two: Assess Safety

You’ve called 911, and the fire is still raging, so take a split second to gauge your safety and your family member’s safety. If a child, senior, or someone with mobility issues is nearby the fire, evacuate them first.

Then consider if it is safe to fight the fire. According to FEMA, you need to ensure that:

  • The fire is contained and still small
  • You are not at risk to inhale smoke
  • You have a way to escape the fire if you fail
  • Your instincts tell you its okay

If you are panicking, you will not make the best decisions for your safety. It’s okay to recognize that the fire is more than you can handle, just evacuate.

Step Three: Use a Fire Extinguisher

You have to use a “C” rated fire extinguisher on electrical fires—remember C stands for “current.” Extinguishers are often rated for multiple types of fires, so an ABC extinguisher is perfect. If you have one:

  • Pull the pin off
  • Aim the nozzle at the bottom of the fire
  • Squeeze the extinguisher’s lever
  • Sweep the extinguisher back and forth across the base of the fire

What if You Don’t Have a Fire Extinguisher?

Fighting an electrical fire without a fire extinguisher is particularly dangerous because we reach for water instinctively to put out fires, but water will make an electrical fire more dangerous. If you try to use water, you may even electrocute yourself.

Instead, you first need to turn off the power to the electrical outlet or device that is on fire. It may not be safe to do this without a fire fighter’s equipment. But, if you are certain it is safe, you may flip the main breaker in the electrical outlet (it’s a larger breaker) which cuts power to the whole house.

Once the power has been cut off, the fire can be doused like a normal fire, with water or an “A” rated fire extinguisher.

If your home has been damaged by an electrical fire, all you need to do is make a single call to SERVPRO of Salem/Peabody/Marblehead. We file the claim with your insurance carrier, handle damage removal, fix damage including from smoke, clean the debris, and fully restore your home. Contact us today at 978.744.4545, we are available 24/7 to help.

An After the Fire Checklist

5/29/2019 (Permalink)

After the fire checklist
  1. Contact your local disaster relief service, such as The Red Cross, if you need temporary housing, food and medicines.
  2. If you are insured, contact your insurance company for detailed instructions on protecting the property, conducting inventory and contacting fire damage restoration companies. If you are not insured, try contacting private organizations for aid and assistance.
  3. Check with the fire department to make sure your residence is safe to enter. Be watchful of any structural damage caused by the fire.
  4. The fire department should see that utilities are either safe to use or are disconnected before they leave the site. DO NOT attempt to reconnect utilities yourself.
  5. Conduct an inventory of damaged property and items. Do not throwaway any damaged goods until after an inventory is made.
  6. Try to locate valuable documents and records. Refer to information on contacts and the replacement process inside this brochure.
  7. If you leave your home, contact the local police department to let them know the site will be unoccupied.
  8. Begin saving receipts for any money you spend related to fire loss. The receipts may be needed later by the insurance company and for verifying losses claimed on income tax.
  9. Notify your mortgage company of the fire.
  10. Check with an accountant or the Internal Revenue Service about special benefits for people recovering from fire loss.

In the unfortunate event of a fire please call SERVPRO of Salem/Peabody/Marblehead at 978.744.4545

Why Timing is Critical After a Fire Loss

5/28/2019 (Permalink)

In the event of a fire it is critical to begin cleanup quickly

Startled by the sound of a fire alarm going off, you’re suddenly awake in the middle of the night. You rush out of bed and get yourself and your family out of the house. Once you and your family are safe, you call the fire department to come and calm the flames. After the smoke clears and the fire department leaves, you see your belongings covered in soot and water. It can be overwhelming seeing the damages that fire has caused to your home and belongings but timing is essential in fire damage restoration and you need to act fast to mitigate your home. 

So, take a deep breath, and follow the steps below to get your home on track to recovery. 

1. Companies You Want to Contact

Fire Restoration Service

The longer you let your home sit in soot and water damage, the further the damage. This is why it is crucial to start the fire restoration process right away. After speaking to a reputable fire restoration company like SERVPRO of Salem/Peabody/Marblehead, they will be able to develop a custom action plan to restore your home.  An expert will be dispatched  to your home to review the damage, get a clean up plan in place and save as much of your belongings as possible. 

Insurance Company

Contact your insurance company and alert them of the situation at hand.  They will be able to shed a little light on this dark situation by informing you of the next steps you need to take. With their guidance, you will be able to navigate the first initial steps of your fire damage claims. In addition, they will be able to inform you of the best practices you should take such as making a list and taking pictures of damaged items for documentation. 

Utility and Lending Companies 

Paying your bills and living expenses in addition to paying to having your home and belonging restored can be financially exhausting. Utility and lending companies realize this and they know the hardship a family can face in the event of disaster such as a house fire. Contact them, explain your situation, and see if they offer any hardship programs that would lower your payments or stop them completely until you get back on your feet.

Physician 

Do you or a family member rely on daily medication to stay healthy? Depending on the extent of the fire damage or the origin of it, retrieving medication may not be possible. Contact your family physician and request to have your medication filled at your nearest pharmacy. 

Child’s School

If you have a child in school you may want to contact the school and alert them of the situation at hand. If the fire damage deems your home unlivable you may need to stay with a family member and their home can be too far from the school. Teachers and principles are understanding of the difficulties a child and family faces in the event of a disaster and may allow them to do class work at home.

2. Disaster Relief 

Disasters can devastate a family and can be especially hard if staying with family member is not an option. If this is the case, look for local disaster relief programs in your area.  These agencies may be able to give you shelter, food, medication, and water until you can go back into your home. 

3. Replace Important Documents 

In the event of a life threatening fire, you’re probably not going to think about grabbing the safe in your house that contain important documents. Most important documents can be replaced. Here are just a few of the documents that you need to get replaced right away.

  • Passport 
  • Driver’s license
  • Birth, marriage, and death certificates
  • Damaged money (you can exchange it for undamaged cash with the treasury department) 
  • Social security card
  • Bank documents
  • School records
  • Tax records
  • Vehicle registration

4. Start Fire Clean Up 

If the fire department gave you permission to enter your home after they leave then you can start the cleaning process while you wait for the restoration company to arrive. The sooner you get the jump on this, the more likely you’ll be able to save your belongings and home. Here are some steps you can take to help begin the restoration process:

Ventilation 

First and foremost you have to get the polluted air out. Open all your windows and turn on any box/floor fans that you have to circulate the air out your home. If the fire department has advised against the use of electronics for safety reasons do not use fans that use your homes electricity such as box fans. 

Cleaning

Circulating air out your home does not take care of soot alone. After a fire, a smoky smell will linger in your air until soot is completely removed. Try to remove as much soot from your home as possible by sweeping. The longer your belonging are covered in soot, the more it will continue to deteriorate. 

Start Fire Damage Restoration Right Away 

When your home has gone through a fire, time is of the essence to save, recover and restore your belongings from fire damage. Following these steps are essential to begin the fire damages restoration process in turning your house into a home again. 

Have you called a fire restoration service yet? Contact SERVPRO of Salem/Peabody/Marblehead to schedule an appointment at 978.744.4545.

Why to Board Up After a Fire Loss

5/24/2019 (Permalink)

Protect your property and belongings after a fire by boarding up your structure

If your commercial property in Salem, Peabody, Marblehead, Swampscott or Middleton MA has experienced a fire, there are several reasons why you might want to board up structural damage or windows. In addition to keeping the external elements out of a building with fire damage, boarding up can also prevent additional losses due to looting and make the fire cleanup process easier. 

Most full-service restoration specialists offer boarding-up services. Here are four reasons to board-up after a fire.

1. There is still viable stock on the premises. If products that appear viable remain in the building, you should consider boarding up. These items may require assessment and cleaning and may not be fit for sale, but having them properly processed rather than stolen can be helpful for insurance purposes.

2. You want to protect electronics and other valuables. Depending on the extent of the fire damage, you may be able to restore some electronics or other valuable property to working condition. Loss can be far more expensive than restoration or covered replacement.

3. You need to keep out the elements. If the structure of your property has sustained extensive damage, you should try to keep the elements out. Exposure to additional water, wind, or sunlight can compound the damage caused by smoke residue and soot.

4. You want to limit soot damage. It is generally a good idea to reduce foot traffic on the scene of a recent fire. When soot gets embedded into carpeting or upholstery, it can be much more difficult to restore these materials to a pre-fire condition.

Talk to restoration experts at SERVPRO of Salem/Peabody/Marblehead, about whether boarding up is a good strategy for preventing loss and limiting damage after a fire. Your major concern is likely to be how to recover from fire damage as quickly and completely as possible. Preventing looting and exposure to the elements can make fire cleanup more successful. Don’t hesitate to call us (978) 744-4545.

Fire Damage Restoration Tips

3/14/2019 (Permalink)

Call the experts at SERVPRO of Salem/Peabody/Marblehead for your fire loss

We’re not going to kid you. Fire damage restoration is tough work. People call SERVPRO of Salem/Peabody/Marblehead frequently to ask for advice on how to clean up after a fire.  Here are seven of the best tips we give people who ask about fire damage restoration.

Most people can put these tips into practice. But remember that fire damage restoration takes time, work, and skill. Realistically consider whether you want to try these ideas on your own or whether you’d be better off hiring highly trained restoration specialists who will guarantee their work.

  1. Remove Smoke Damage

With any fire you’ll have a degree of smoke damage to your walls, wall paper, and paint. If the smoke damage is not too serious, you should be able to scrub it clean with detergents and bleach. Soot from smoke damage is greasy stuff, so always try to dust as much of it off from a surface before trying to scrub the surface clean. Often, you’ll want to repaint, but make sure all surfaces are clean and dry before you paint.

  1. Limit Activity & Other Simple Fire Damage Restoration Steps

Until your house is restored, limit your activity and movement in the house. This helps prevent soot particles from being embedded into upholstery and carpets. Keep people’s hands clean so you don’t further soil upholstery, walls, and woodwork. Protect your things by placing clean towels or old linens on rugs, upholstery, and carpet traffic areas. Before you clean know the best cleaning method for that particular cleaning job (one example: Clean and protect chrome with a light coating of petroleum jelly or oil.) Wash both sides of the leaves on your houseplants. Change your HVAC filter and tape double layers of cheesecloth over air registers.

Call SERVPRO of Salem/Peabody/Marblehead for Cleanup and Restoration. Call (978) 744-4545.

  1. Get Rid of Mold & Mildew

Firefighters are great. They save many a live and many a home. But they do introduce mold and mildew into houses when they must use water to extinguish the fire. SERVPRO of Salem/Peabody/Marblehead highly recommends you hire fire damage restoration professionals to deal with mold and mildew. Mold and mildew can cause serious health problems. It’s difficult for a nonprofessional to know for certain if he’s clean up all the areas affected by the mold and mildew. And mold and mildew can contaminate your furniture, carpets, clothing, mattresses, walls, and vents. The best thing you can do immediately is to air out every room and clean out all vents and filters.

  1. Replace Carpets. Clean And Dry Your Floors

Your floors and carpets end up absorbing the worst of the damage from all the water used to put out a fire. In almost every case, SERVPRO of Salem/Peabody/Marblehead recommends that you pull up any carpets that have water damage and replace them. Water can also seep underneath vinyl flooring and into the cracks in hardwood. You must address this. If you have experience with flooring, you can lift it up and clean under it. But you may want to call a professional fire damage restoration company to assist you.

  1. Avoid Smearing Soot Into Clothing

Cleaning smoke damage from clothing is one of the biggest jobs you’ll have after a fire. Make sure you don’t smear the greasy soot into the clothing or just throw the smoky clothes into the wash. Often times dry cleaning is the best bet, and you should ask around local dry cleaners to see if any have experience with post-fire laundry. Removing smoke odor is another issue and we’ve covered it in another blog post.

Call SERVPRO of Salem/Peabody/Marblehead for Cleanup and Restoration. Call (978) 744-4545.

  1. Scrub, Soak, And Cleaning Dishes

Dishes are also important items to clean thoroughly after a fire because they will be in contact with your food. Scrub all dishes well, let them soak in a solution of bleach and water (2 tablespoons of bleach per gallon) for at least 20 minutes and scrub some more for safety. When in doubt, if a dish, pot, or pan won’t come clean, cut your losses and throw it out – especially rubber or wooden dishes that absorb smoke.

Help Is Here

The team at SERVPRO of Salem/Peabody/Marblehead also has specialized training and experience in fire restoration services, natural disaster prevention, water damage, chemical cleanup, and natural disaster cleanup. Call SERVPRO of Salem/Peabody/Marblehead (978.744.4545) anytime.

The Hidden Damage of a Fire Loss

3/13/2019 (Permalink)

A fire can lead to soot, water and mold damage

There’s more to fire damage than meets the eye. Fire can also cause hidden damages that may not be as easily visible. The two main culprits: smoke/soot damage and water damage. Knowing about these additional impacts on your property, and how to properly take care of them, helps ensure you’re reimbursed appropriately for your claim.

Smoke/Soot Damage

Smoke/soot damage is one of the primary hidden damages of the fire loss. Here are some things to look for to determine whether you have smoke damage:

  • Stained fabric and upholstery
  • Paint discoloration.
  • Rust, pitting and corrosion of piping, jewelry and other metal objects
  • Strong odor
  • Flooring damage

You need to take care of smoke and soot damage, and pronto! This is not the time for a DIY fix in an attempt to save a few bucks on your home’s restoration after a fire. 

Failure to properly deal with smoke/soot damage can cause long-term issues for your health as well as your property. Exposure to smoke/soot during fire restoration can occur via the skin and eyes, inhalation and ingestion. Because airborne soot particulate is invisible, you may unknowingly be affected. Once soot enters your bloodstream, it can cause respiratory issues, shortness of breath, bronchitis, asthma, stroke, heart attack, cancer, and even premature death. In infants, even short-term exposure to soot has been shown to have lifelong health consequences.

Because it can linger on surfaces and get inside of your electronics, appliances and other property, soot is usually a significant contributor to property damage after a fire. Plus the longer it remains, the harder it is to remove. Calling SERVPRO of Salem/Peabody/Marblehead ensures that this soot will be cleaned up properly and professionally!

Water Damage

Before dealing with the fire damage created by smoke/soot, you must first deal with the water damage. Although it’s a relief when firefighters put out the fire, pouring all that water on the flames results in water damage that can cause significant structural issues, damage to your electronic devices, appliances, furniture and important documents and, if not remedied quickly, hazardous mold growth.

Black mold can release dangerous spores into the air that can cause nausea, headaches and severe respiratory problems especially susceptible for children, the elderly and people with deficient immune systems. Pets can also be susceptible to health problems associated with the proliferation of black mold.

It’s important to take care of water damage as soon as possible so (1) you can get on with the rest of the resulting damage, and (2) to ensure hazardous mold does not grow in your property and negatively impact the health of you and your family. This is something affected homeowners cannot realistically be expected to do on their own. The only real viable solution to the dangerous effects of water damage is to call the professionals at SERVPRO of Salem/Peabody/Marblehead at 978.744.4545!

Wildfire Damage Event

3/3/2019 (Permalink)

SERVPRO of Salem/Peabody/Marblehead provides fire, soot and water damage restoration service in Essex County

The  wildfires in Southern California were devastating blazes that burned at least 96,000 acres in the Ventura area and 116,000 acres in Los Angeles County. Evacuations closed hundreds of schools and forced 200,000 people to seek safety. 

Our thoughts are with those who may have been put in harms’ way during this event. In many cases, a fire can result in a total loss for a home or business, but in others it may be a partial loss, or can result in mild smoke damage. If your home or business is affected by a fire, SERVPRO of Salem/Peabody/Marblehead is Here to Help®. 

About SERVPRO of Salem/Peabody/ Marblehead

SERVPRO of Salem/Peabody/Marblehead specializes in the cleanup and restoration of residential and commercial property after a fire, smoke or water damage event. Our staff is highly trained in property damage restoration. From initial and ongoing training at SERVPRO’s corporate training facility to regular IICRC-industry certification, rest assured our staff is equipped with the knowledge to restore your property.

Fire or Soot Damage? Call Us Today – We’re Ready To Help  978.744.4545

Fire Damage Restoration Process in Essex County

5/24/2018 (Permalink)

Even small fires can cause extensive damage.

After the fire trucks leave, your home likely suffers from fire and smoke damage and extensive water damage from firefighting efforts. SERVPRO of Salem/Peabody/Marblehead have the specialized fire restoration training needed to restore your home to pre-fire condition.

Have Questions About Fire, Smoke, or Soot Damage? Call Today – 978.744.4545

Every fire damage event is a little different, and requires a unique solution, but the general process stays the same. The steps listed below illustrate our process for the “typical” fire damage emergency.

Step 1: Emergency Contact

The restoration process begins when you call us. Our representative will ask questions regarding the fire damage event that will help us respond immediately with the appropriate equipment and resources. 

Step 2: Inspection and Fire Damage Assessment

We carefully inspect and test adjoining rooms of your property to determine the extent of the fire, smoke, and soot damage. This step is crucial to developing a plan of action. 

Step 3: Immediate Board-Up and Roof-Tarp Service

Fire damage can often compromise windows, walls, and roofs. To maintain security and to protect against further damage, we can board up missing windows and walls and place tarps on damaged roofs. 

Step 4: Water Removal and Drying (if water damage is present)

The water removal process begins almost immediately and removes the majority of the water. We then use dehumidifiers and air movers to remove the remaining water and complete the drying process. 

Step 5: Removal of Smoke and Soot from All Surfaces

We use specialized equipment and techniques to remove smoke and soot from ceilings, walls, and other surfaces. 

Step 6: Cleaning and Sanitizing

We clean, sanitize, and disinfect all of the restorable items and structures that were damaged by the fire. We use a variety of cleaning techniques to restore your belongings to pre-fire condition. We’re also trained to remove odors using industrial air scrubbers and fogging equipment.

Step 7: Restoration

Restoration is the final step—getting your home or business to its pre-fire condition. Restoration may involve minor repairs, such as replacing drywall, painting, and installing new carpet; or it may entail major repairs such as the reconstruction of various areas or rooms in a home or business.

Your Belongings and Fire Damage

5/24/2018 (Permalink)

Fire damage affects your belongings too.

Fire damage, including smoke and soot, affects not only the structure of your house but also your belongings. SERVPRO of Salem/Peabody/Marblehead understands your family’s furniture, clothing, keepsakes, and other belongings make your house more than a structure; they make it home.

If You Have Questions or Need Help, Call Us Today – 978.744.4545

Contents Restoration

SERVPRO of Salem/ Peabody/ Marblehead specializes in restoring contents damaged by water, fire, or mold. Our expertise and “restore” versus “replace” mentality can help you save money while preserving precious keepsakes that can’t be replaced. We pretest your belongings to determine what items we can restore to pre-fire condition. We use several methods of cleaning your contents, including:

  • Dry Cleaning - Used for cleaning light residues or to pre-clean prior to wet cleaning.
  • Wet Cleaning - An effective cleaning method for removing moderate to heavy residues.
  • Spray and Wipe -Effective for items that can’t withstand wet cleaning.
  • Foam Cleaning - Used for upholstery fabrics that might shrink or bleed if wet cleaned.
  • Abrasive Cleaning - Involves agitation of the surface being cleaned.
  • Immersion Cleaning - Contents are dipped into a bath of the cleaning product.
     

Move-Outs/Pack-Outs

If your home requires extensive restoration or cleaning due to fire damage, SERVPRO of Salem/Peabody/Marblehead can conduct an organized, efficient move-out of the affected area. Move-out will provide several benefits, including:

  • A quicker remodeling process
  • Protecting items from potential damage
  • Protecting contents from further on-site damage

When restoration is completed, we will work with you to coordinate the move-in according to your needs. The services offered upon move-in may depend on your insurance coverage.

Electronic Cleanup

Fire-damaged electronics can present a serious hazard. Do not attempt to turn on or operate any electrical device that you suspect has been damaged by fire. Smoke residues can contain acids that corrode metal surfaces. If the residues are not removed, corrosion causes electronic failure in the device. We will coordinate the restoration of your electronics, including:

  • Television sets
  • DVD players
  • Computers
  • And more

The key to restoring electronics is taking prompt action to prevent further damage. Electronics will be cleaned and inspected by a qualified electronics technician.

Document / Photograph Drying

When your valuable documents, including photographs, are damaged by water or fire, extreme caution should be taken to help ensure the fire damage does not destroy the document. Although some documents may not be restored to pre-fire damage condition, SERVPRO of Salem/Peabody/Marblehead can save a great deal and help minimize additional damage. 

Depending on the type of documents and the level of fire, smoke, or soot damage, they have five options for the restoration of documents:

  • Air Drying
  • Dehumidification
  • Freezer Drying
  • Vacuum Freeze Drying
  • Vacuum Thermal Drying

Contents Claim Inventory Service

When a fire emergency strikes, the damage can often feel overwhelming. We can help ease the worry and confusion during the recovery process by offering our Contents Claim Inventory Service (CCIS), which provides a detailed and accurate list of your belongings. We take a room-by-room inventory of your contents, including digital photos, and in some instances, bar coding.

Our Contents Claim Inventory Service:

  • Preloss list and value of contents
  • Detailed and accurate report
  • Better information to settle claims quicker
  • Assistance with burden of proof for claims

Peace of mind when you need it most!

Smoke and Soot Damage

5/23/2018 (Permalink)

Smoke and Soot Damage Can Cause a Pervasive Odor in Your Northshore Home

Smoke and soot is very invasive and can penetrate various cavities within your home, causing hidden damage and odor. Our smoke damage expertise and experience allows us to inspect and accurately assess the extent of the damage to develop a comprehensive plan of action.  

Smoke and soot facts:

  • Hot smoke migrates to cooler areas and upper levels of a structure.
  • Smoke flows around plumbing systems, seeping through the holes used by pipes to go from floor to floor.
  • The type of smoke may greatly affect the restoration process.

Different Types of Smoke

There are two different types of smoke–wet and dry. As a result, there are different types of soot residue after a fire. Before restoration begins, SERVPRO of Salem/Peabody/Marblehead will test the soot to determine which type of smoke damage occurred. The cleaning procedures will then be based on the information identified during pretesting. Here is some additional information:

Wet Smoke – Plastic and Rubber

  • Low heat, smoldering, pungent odor, sticky, smeary. Smoke webs are more difficult to clean.

Dry Smoke – Paper and Wood

  • Fast burning, high temperatures, heat rises therefore smoke rises.

Protein Fire Residue – Produced by evaporation of material rather than from a fire

  • Virtually invisible, discolors paints and varnishes, extreme pungent odor. 

Our Fire Damage Restoration Services

Since each smoke and fire damage situation is a little different, each one requires a unique solution tailored for the specific conditions.  We have the equipment, expertise, and experience to restore your fire and smoke damage.  We will also treat your family with empathy and respect and your property with care.

Have Questions about Fire, Smoke, or Soot Damage?
Call Us Today –978.744.4545

Commercial Fire Damage

3/1/2018 (Permalink)

Commercial fire damage can be devastating for businesses.

Fire damage is especially devastating for a business or commercial property. In addition to the fire and smoke damage, significant water damage from firefighting efforts and fire suppression systems may occur. Every hour spent restoring your business back to pre-fire condition is an hour of lost revenue and productivity. If your business experiences a fire loss, call the fire and water damage restoration experts, SERVPRO of Salem, Peabody and Marblehead and we’ll respond immediately to get you back to business.

Our staff is highly trained in property damage restoration. From initial and ongoing training at SERVPRO’s Corporate Training Facility to regular IICRC industry certifications, rest assured our staff is equipped with the knowledge to restore your property.

The Institute of Inspection Cleaning and Restoration Certification (IICRC) certifies and sets the standards for the cleaning and restoration industries. Our Professionals study IICRC standards and best practices in water restoration, fire restoration, mold remediation, carpet and upholstery cleaning, and other cleaning and restoration courses.

Call SERVPRO of Salem/Peabody/Marblehead at 978.744.4545 for any fire damage restoration needs!

Fire Damage Restoration Process

3/1/2018 (Permalink)

After the fire, call SERVPRO of Salem/Peabody/Marblehead!

After the fire trucks leave, your home likely suffers from fire and smoke damage and extensive water damage from firefighting efforts. SERVPRO of Salem/Peabody/Marblehead have the specialized fire restoration training needed to restore your home to pre-fire condition.

Have Questions About Fire, Smoke, or Soot Damage? Call Today – 978.744.4545

Every fire damage event is a little different, and requires a unique solution, but the general process stays the same. The steps listed below illustrate our process for the “typical” fire damage emergency.

Step 1: Emergency Contact

The restoration process begins when you call us. Our representative will ask questions regarding the fire damage event that will help us respond immediately with the appropriate equipment and resources. 

Step 2: Inspection and Fire Damage Assessment

We carefully inspect and test adjoining rooms of your property to determine the extent of the fire, smoke, and soot damage. This step is crucial to developing a plan of action. 

Step 3: Immediate Board-Up and Roof-Tarp Service

Fire damage can often compromise windows, walls, and roofs. To maintain security and to protect against further damage, we can board up missing windows and walls and place tarps on damaged roofs. 

Step 4: Water Removal and Drying (if water damage is present)

The water removal process begins almost immediately and removes the majority of the water. We then use dehumidifiers and air movers to remove the remaining water and complete the drying process. 

Step 5: Removal of Smoke and Soot from All Surfaces

We use specialized equipment and techniques to remove smoke and soot from ceilings, walls, and other surfaces. 

Step 6: Cleaning and Sanitizing

We clean, sanitize, and disinfect all of the restorable items and structures that were damaged by the fire. We use a variety of cleaning techniques to restore your belongings to pre-fire condition. We’re also trained to remove odors using industrial air scrubbers and fogging equipment.

Step 7: Restoration

Restoration is the final step—getting your home or business to its pre-fire condition. Restoration may involve minor repairs, such as replacing drywall, painting, and installing new carpet; or it may entail major repairs such as the reconstruction of various areas or rooms in a home or business.

Smoke and Soot Cleanup

2/7/2018 (Permalink)

Smoke and Soot Damage Can Cause a Pervasive Odor

Smoke and soot is very invasive and can penetrate various cavities within your home, causing hidden damage and odor. Our smoke damage expertise and experience allows us to inspect and accurately assess the extent of the damage to develop a comprehensive plan of action.  

Smoke and soot facts:

  • Hot smoke migrates to cooler areas and upper levels of a structure.
  • Smoke flows around plumbing systems, seeping through the holes used by pipes to go from floor to floor.
  • The type of smoke may greatly affect the restoration process.

Different Types of Smoke

There are two different types of smoke–wet and dry. As a result, there are different types of soot residue after a fire. Before restoration begins, SERVPRO of Salem/Peabody/Marblehead will test the soot to determine which type of smoke damage occurred. The cleaning procedures will then be based on the information identified during pretesting. Here is some additional information:

Wet Smoke – Plastic and Rubber

  • Low heat, smoldering, pungent odor, sticky, smeary. Smoke webs are more difficult to clean.

Dry Smoke – Paper and Wood

  • Fast burning, high temperatures, heat rises therefore smoke rises.

Protein Fire Residue – Produced by evaporation of material rather than from a fire

  • Virtually invisible, discolors paints and varnishes, extreme pungent odor. 

Our Fire Damage Restoration Services

Since each smoke and fire damage situation is a little different, each one requires a unique solution tailored for the specific conditions.  We have the equipment, expertise, and experience to restore your fire and smoke damage.  We will also treat your family with empathy and respect and your property with care.

Have Questions about Fire, Smoke, or Soot Damage?
Call Us Today – 978.744.4545

Fire Safety

5/23/2017 (Permalink)

Fire is FAST!

There is little time! In less than 30 seconds a small flame can get completely out of control and turn into a major fire. It only takes minutes for thick black smoke to fill a house or for it to be engulfed in flames. Most deadly fires occur in the home when people are asleep. If you wake up to a fire, you won't have time to grab valuables because fire spreads too quickly and the smoke is too thick. There is only time to escape.

Fire is HOT!

Heat is more threatening than flames. A fire's heat alone can kill. Room temperatures in a fire can be 100 degrees at floor level and rise to 600 degrees at eye level. Inhaling this super-hot air will scorch your lungs. This heat can melt clothes to your skin. In five minutes, a room can get so hot that everything in it ignites at once: this is called flashover.

Fire is DARK!

Fire isn't bright, it's pitch black. Fire starts bright, but quickly produces black smoke and complete darkness. If you wake up to a fire you may be blinded, disoriented and unable to find your way around the home you've lived in for years.

Fire is DEADLY!

Smoke and toxic gases kill more people than flames do. Fire uses up the oxygen you need and produces smoke and poisonous gases that kill. Breathing even small amounts of smoke and toxic gases can make you drowsy, disoriented and short of breath. The odorless, colorless fumes can lull you into a deep sleep before the flames reach your door. You may not wake up in time to escape.

Only when we know the true nature of fire can we prepare our families and ourselves.

Create and Practice a Fire Escape Plan

In the event of a fire, remember that every second counts, so you and your family must always be prepared. Escape plans help you get out of your home quickly.

Twice each year, practice your home fire escape plan.  Some tips to consider when preparing this plan include:

  • Find two ways to get out of each room.
  • If the primary way is blocked by fire or smoke, you will need a second way out. A secondary route might be a window onto a neighboring roof or a collapsible ladder for escape from upper story windows.
  • Only purchase collapsible ladders evaluated by a nationally recognized laboratory, such as Underwriters Laboratory (UL).
  • Make sure that windows are not stuck, screens can be taken out quickly, and that security bars can be properly opened.
  • Practice feeling your way out of the house in the dark or with your eyes closed.
  • Windows and doors with security bars must have quick release devices to allow them to be opened immediately in an emergency. Make sure everyone in the family understands and practices how to properly operate and open locked or barred doors and windows.
  • Teach children not to hide from firefighters.

Smoke Alarms

A properly installed and maintained smoke alarm is the only thing in your home that can alert you and your family to a fire 24 hours a day, seven days a week. A working smoke alarm significantly increases your chances of surviving a deadly home fire.

  • Install both ionization AND photoelectric smoke alarms, OR dual sensor smoke alarms, which contain both ionization and photoelectric smoke sensors
  • Test batteries monthly.
  • Replace batteries in battery-powered and hard-wired smoke alarms at least once a year (except non-replaceable 10-year lithium batteries)
  • Install smoke alarms on every level of your home, including the basement. The U.S. Fire Administration recommends installing smoke alarms both inside and outside of sleeping areas.
  • Always follow the manufacturer’s installation instructions when installing smoke alarms.
  • Replace the entire smoke alarm unit every 8-10 years or according to manufacturer’s instructions.
  • Never disable a smoke alarm while cooking – it can be a deadly mistake. Open a window or door and press the “hush” button, wave a towel at the alarm to clear the air, or move the entire alarm several feet away from the location.

Smoke Alarm Safety People with Access or Functional Needs

  • Caregivers are encouraged to check the smoke alarms of those who are unable to do it themselves.
  • Audible alarms for visually impaired people should pause with a small window of silence between each successive cycle so that they can listen to instructions or voices of others.
  • Smoke alarms with a vibrating pad or flashing light are available for the hearing impaired. Contact your local fire department for information about obtaining a flashing or vibrating smoke alarm.
  • Smoke alarms with a strobe light outside the home to catch the attention of neighbors, and emergency call systems for summoning help, are also available.

More Fire Safety Tips

  • Sleep with your door closed.
  • Only those trained in the proper use and maintenance of fire extinguishers should consider using them when appropriate.  Contact your local fire department for information on training in your area and what kind to buy for your home.
  • Consider installing an automatic fire sprinkler system in your residence.
  • Ask your local fire department to inspect your residence for fire safety and prevention.
  • Crawl low under any smoke to your exit - heavy smoke and poisonous gases collect first along the ceiling.
  • When the smoke alarm sounds, get out fast. You may have only seconds to escape safely.
  • If there is smoke blocking your door or first way out, use your second way out.
  • Smoke is toxic. If you must escape through smoke, get low and go under the smoke to your way out.
  • Before opening a door, feel the doorknob and door. If either is hot, leave the door closed and use your second way out.
  • If there is smoke coming around the door, leave the door closed and use your second way out.
  • If you open a door, open it slowly. Be ready to shut it quickly if heavy smoke or fire is present.
  • If you can’t get to someone needing assistance, leave the home and call 9-1-1 or the fire department. Tell the emergency operator where the person is located.
  • If pets are trapped inside your home, tell firefighters right away.
  • If you can’t get out, close the door and cover vents and cracks around doors with cloth or tape to keep smoke out.  Call 9-1-1 or your fire department. Say where you are and signal for help at the window with a light-colored cloth or a flashlight.
  • If your clothes catch fire, stop, drop, and roll – stop immediately, drop to the ground, and cover your face with your hands.  Roll over and over or back and forth until the fire is out.  If you or someone else cannot stop, drop, and roll, smother the flames with a blanket or towel.  Use cool water to treat the burn immediately for 3 to 5 minutes.  Cover with a clean, dry cloth.  Get medical help right away by calling 9-1-1 or the fire department.
  

Fire Restoration

5/23/2017 (Permalink)

After A Fire Contact SERVPRO For Fire Damage Repair and Restoration

While the amount of what you own may not reach hoarder level, after a fire has rampaged through your home, you may still be surprised at the number of items covered in soot that you now need to sort through. Without sifting through the many items, it's impossible to clean the ones that are still good. This is not a small job, and many people just throw everything away. This isn't good for the environment, or for your bank account.

Replacing everything in your North Shore home that shows signs of fire damage might seem like the easiest route, but it isn't the best course for all people. If you have very few items, and they are visibly damaged by heat instead of soot, then that might be the only course you have anyway. For those who have families and all of the many things that go along with taking care of children, you'll be aware of the memories you'll also be throwing away. This also applies to those whose children have grown and moved out, and for many others.

Cleaning up after a fire is a complicated process. Soot is also full of carcinogens and irritants. The particles can be so small that they are also very abrasive, and cleaning must be one as soon as possible. One or two unskilled people will not be able to clean at the rate needed to stop the corrosive activity of the soot. Instead, a team of skilled and highly trained individuals should be utilized to help ensure that your items are cleaned correctly.

At SERVPRO, we have experience and skills backed by training and certification in all aspects of fire damage clean up, along with repair and restoration concepts that will have your home looking, feeling, and smelling “Like it never even happened.” We won't only clean your personal belongings and furniture but also your walls, carpeting, rugs, ceilings, upholstered and non-upholstered furniture, glass and metal accents, cabinetry, doors and wooden trim, and draperies. We will bag and remove your clothing, bedding, and other linens to be washed at our facility with special cleaners that will not only remove the soot, but also the scent of the fire, and return them to you smelling fresh and clean again.

Smoke & Soot Facts

5/18/2017 (Permalink)

Smoke and soot is very invasive and can penetrate various cavities within your home, causing hidden damage and odor. Our smoke damage expertise and experience allows us to inspect and accurately assess the extent of the damage to develop a comprehensive plan of action.  

Smoke and soot facts:

  • Hot smoke migrates to cooler areas and upper levels of a structure.
  • Smoke flows around plumbing systems, seeping through the holes used by pipes to go from floor to floor.
  • The type of smoke may greatly affect the restoration process.

Different Types of Smoke

There are two different types of smoke–wet and dry. As a result, there are different types of soot residue after a fire. Before restoration begins, SERVPRO of Saginaw will test the soot to determine which type of smoke damage occurred. The cleaning procedures will then be based on the information identified during pretesting. Here is some additional information:

Wet Smoke – Plastic and Rubber

  • Low heat, smoldering, pungent odor, sticky, smeary. Smoke webs are more difficult to clean.

Dry Smoke – Paper and Wood

  • Fast burning, high temperatures, heat rises therefore smoke rises.

Protein Fire Residue – Produced by evaporation of material rather than from a fire

  • Virtually invisible, discolors paints and varnishes, extreme pungent odor. 

Our Fire Damage Restoration Services

Since each smoke and fire damage situation is a little different, each one requires a unique solution tailored for the specific conditions.  We have the equipment, expertise, and experience to restore your fire and smoke damage.  We will also treat your family with empathy and respect and your property with care.

Have Questions about Fire, Smoke, or Soot Damage?
Call Us Today – (978) 744-4545

  SERVPRO of Salem, Peabody, Marblehead Massachusetts
 Superior Company For Mold Damage Restoration

Spontaneous Combustion

2/17/2017 (Permalink)

Spontaneous Coal Combustion

 

Spontaneous heating of coal occurs when sufficient oxygen is available to sustain the low temperature reaction of coal with oxygen but the heat produced by the coal oxidation is not adequately dissipated by conduction or convection.

This process begins a vicious cycle where the rate of oxidation increases as the temperature increases and vice versa, or in what the study authors call a thermal runaway where a fire ensues.

Relatively common, as of January 2013, over 200 coal fires were burning in the U.S. alone. These blazes are notoriously difficult to extinguish, and one coalmine fire that could have arisen from spontaneous combustion, the Centralia Mine Fire which ignited in 1962, still burns today.

Spontaneous Hay Combustion

Counter-intuitively, hay will spontaneously combust if it gets too wet

 

Dry hay (stored at 15 percent moisture or less) is safe for long-term storage. However, if the hay has become wet the quality has been permanently changed and the potential fire hazard from spontaneous combustion increased.

How does this work? this spontaneous heating is the result of biological and chemical forces:

 The wet hay will first stimulate microbial growth and as these organisms grow they produce heat while drying out the surrounding surfaces of the hay for energy. More drying surfaces produces more microbial growth . . . . When the bale temperature reaches about 150F . . . heat resistant bacteria, called exothermic bacteria, start a process of chemical change that rapidly increases the temperatures to the point of spontaneous combustion.

Haystack fires are serious business. One large fire (cause unknown) in Yolo County, California burned for several days, and losses were "estimated at $2 million."

Spontaneous Linseed Oil Combustion

A common household product, linseed oil is used to protect wood and clean tools. Typically, cloth rags are soaked in the oil in order to make application easier; however, when these rags are not properly stored.

Linseed oil evaporates very rapidly causing an exothermic reach, which accelerates as the temperature of the rags increases. When the accumulated heat exceeds the rate of heat dissipation, the temperature increases and may eventually become hot enough to cause the rags to spontaneously combust.

These fires have been known to cause tremendous damage. In 1991, one of the most devastating high rise fires in the United States, in which three firefighters died, was found to have been started when workers left behind rags. 

Easily prevented, "putting your used rags on a non flammable surface to dry, in an open area like your driveway. . . . Just lay them out flat . . . Once they are dry, you can clean them up."

Spontaneous Human Combustion

In the typical case where spontaneous human combustion (SHC) is suspected, a body is found that appears to have been burned from the inside out; and, while there is tremendous burn damage to the person's torso, her extremities (hands, feet and limbs), as well as her surroundings, are not touched by the fire.

 Proponents of SHC will often point to any of several potential internal causes for the blaze. Methane in the intestines (think farts) is often suggested as a fuel source, and some believe naturally occurring enzymes could be the catalyst. Static electricity has also been named as a potential culprit.

These true believers point to stories like that of an Oklahoma man whose horribly burned body was found in his kitchen, surrounded by items and furniture that was not damaged. The 65-year-old victim was known to be a heavy smoker and drinker. Some proponents point out that alcohol is also flammable, but argue that its action had to be internal, or else other flammable items in the home would have burned.

Naysayers take this same evidence and use it to disprove the theory. They claim that these deaths occur because the human body has acted like an inside-out candle

 A candle is composed of a wick on the inside surrounded by a wax made of flammable fatty acids. The wax ignites the wick and keeps it burning. In the human body, the body fat acts as the flammable substance, and the victim's clothing or hair acts as the wick. As the fat melts from the heat, it soaks into the clothing and acts as a wax-like substance to keep the wick burning slowly. Scientists say this is why victims' bodies are destroyed yet their surroundings are barely burned.

So, regarding the Oklahoma man, naysayers would argue that he likely passed out, from drinking or otherwise, and a hot ash from his cigarette, or another external source, ignited the fire. As fire tends to burn upwards, rather than out, as long as nothing extremely flammable is around the man, we simply have a human candle that burns away leaving surrounding areas seemingly untouched.

 

Recent scholarship appears to have discovered the fuel, if not the ignition mechanism. In a study performed by Cambridge research biologist, Brian J. Ford, it was determined that acetone, a naturally occurring substance in the body, could cause the injuries seen with suspected SHC victims.

Acetone is characterized by Prof. Ford as "one flammable constituent in the body that can greatly increase in concentration," and this happens when a body is in a state of ketosis. Potential causes of ketosis include certain diets, diabetes, teething and even alcoholism. Regardless of its source, acetone is highly flammable.

 In his experiment, Prof. Ford

Marinated pork tissue in acetone [then used it] to make scale models of humans, which we clothed and set alight. They burned to ash within half an hour

Ford concluded that "for the first time a feasible cause of human combustion has been experimentally demonstrated."

 

8 Candle Safety Tips

2/17/2017 (Permalink)

8 Candle Safety Tips Everyone in Your House Should Know
 

Candles are the very soul of romance. Their flickering light gives a warmth to everything around them. They figure in song and story and cover the tops of birthday cakes and grace mantles. They are everywhere. Almost every house has at least a few buried somewhere, whether for birthdays, the love of the scent, or even as a decor accent. Candles are so commonplace that people forget just how dangerous they can be. Candles are not just sources of light, they are open flames. Every fire needs to be treated with caution, and candles are no different. That is why every member of every household should know and follow eight basic safety tips every time they light a candle.

How a Candle Works

Candles generate both light and heat through the simple process of combustion. One of the most important things to remember is that even though it is the wick that supports the flame, the wax is what burns. What happens is that when the wick is first lit, it melts the wax.. Because the wick is absorbent, it draws some of the molten wax up to the flame, where it vaporizes and then ignites. It is this burning wax vapor that produces most of the light and heat, reaching up to 2,550 degrees Fahrenheit at its hottest point. This is what makes a candle wick last so long. It simply carries the molten wax, serving as a kind of fuel line. Some of the molten wax does drip down the side, but that is more a measure of inefficiency than anything else. Once the wax is gone, the candle can no longer be used.

8 Candle Safety Tips

Candle safety is all about remembering that a candle is an open flame and treating it accordingly. As long as the candle is treated with the respect it deserves, problems are unlikely. If people in the home are going to be careless with candles, they are quite literally playing with fire. One simple way to ensure safety is to remember the following eight tips.

Tip 1: Always Use a Candle Snuffer

Some people like to blow a candle out, but this can send wax and possibly embers flying. Using water to put out a candle is even worse. The mixture of cold water and hot wax can send the wax splattering everywhere, possibly leading to burns. The cold water can also be dangerous to glass candle holders, as the sudden drop in temperature can cause the glass to crack, potentially spilling hot wax everywhere. A candle snufferstarves the flame of oxygen, ensuring that it goes out gently, without giving the wax a chance to spatter. It is the safest way to douse a candle without worrying about spatter or burning one's fingers on the wick.

Tip 2: Never Leave a Candle Unattended

It is a simple rule for anything that burns; fires should never be left unattended. This is particularly true of candles, as some can easily tip over, greatly increasing the chance of fire. The presence of pets just adds to the danger. Seconds matter when it comes to fire, and unattended fires mean that there is not one present to take action in the most important seconds. It simply is not worth the risk.

Tip 3: Do Not Rely on Candles When the Power Goes Out

It is a common misconception that because people often used candles for light before electricity they should be the first thing to turn to for light when the power goes out. Sadly, this is not the case. Candles were only one of many lighting options used before the proliferation of the electric light, and oil lamps were much more common. In most cases, a flashlight is a much better and safer option when the power is out than a candle. This is especially important when rummaging in a closet, as the flame can catch clothing on fire, turning the minor inconvenience of a power outage into a major disaster.

Tip 4: Always Use a Proper Candle Holder

It is a bad idea to simply stick a candle in a drop of hot wax in the middle of a plate or saucer instead of using a candle holder.. It simply is not safe. A proper candle holder includes both a socket to hold the candle and a well for the drippings. Many also have a ring or other handle in case the candle has to be moved. Candle holders should also be heat resistant so that they can protect the surfaces they rest on, such as tables that could otherwise be scorched from the heat of the candle or wax drippings. It is also important to make sure the holders are set on flat, stable surfaces to minimize the chance they will tip over.

Tip 5: Keep Burning Candles 3 Inches Apart

When arranging candles, it is important that they not be placed too close together to prevent the heat from one candle melting another. This can cause a serious problem because, even if the heat is not sufficient to melt the other candle completely, it can often be more than enough to soften the wax so that the candle can bend, with possibly disastrous results.

Tip 6: Do Not Burn a Candle Down to Nothing

For those who consider themselves frugal in all things, it can be tempting to get the most out of a candle by burning it all the way down to nothingness. While this does ensure the longest burn, that does not mean that it is a good idea. For safety's sake it is better to extinguish the candles once they reach about 2 inches from the bottom or 1/2 inch if the candle is entirely enclosed in a container. This ensures that the wick remains vertical and that the burn stays under control the whole time.

Tip 7: Never Use Candles if Someone in the Home Uses Oxygen

Fire thrives on oxygen, and using candles in a household where someone uses oxygen is courting disaster. The additional oxygen accelerates combustion and turns almost any spark into a runaway fire. While oxygen tanks are enclosed and can be kept far away from candle flames, it simply is not worth the risk to burn a candle anywhere in the vicinity of oxygen.

Tip 8: Keep Burning Candles Away From Drafts

While candles do require ventilation so that they do not exhaust the oxygen in the room, they should also be kept away from drafts in order to ensure a controlled burn. Strong drafts can not only lead to smoke and soot being produced by the candle but also fires if the draft is strong enough. With sufficient air movement, either the candle can be blown over or something light and combustible can be blown into it. Even if the draft is not strong enough for that, it can still lead to uneven burning that shortens the useful life of the candle.

Where to Buy Candles

Candles are available almost anywhere. Consumers who prefer to shop locally can find candles in hobby centers, corner stores, grocery stores, home stores, and major brick-and-mortar chains. People have been selling candles for centuries, and it should be no surprise that they have become ubiquitous. Those who prefer to shop from the comfort of home can find candles at most Internet retailers, major and many minor, as well as online auction sites like eBay.

Buying Candles on eBay

If you prefer to search, just enter the terms you want in the Search box on the main page, and watch the results appear. There really is a candle for every need, and you can use the filters in the sidebar on the results page to narrow your search to show just the candles you want. Once you have the list properly narrowed down, you can use the sort function to arrange order in which the listings are displayed to best fit your priorities, whether that be price or seller distance. The seller profile page is also a great resource to ensure you do business with a reputable individual. You can see the seller's feedback, location, and which shipping company they use. It only takes a few clicks to find both the candles and the seller you want.

Conclusion

Candles can add to the ambiance of any room, but they can also add to the danger. Users should never forget that every time they light a candle they are setting light to an open flame. Even so, the risk of that open flame can be greatly reduced by anyone willing to follow just a few simple tips. In almost every case, the key to these tips is to keep the candle flame under control and away from anything flammable. Keeping the candle vertical also helps, as it performs both functions, helping maintain a safe distance from anything flammable and combustion under control. Ventilation is also important, as both too much and too little airflow around the candle can cause problems. But by following these eight simple tips, it is easy to enjoy the ambiance in safety.

After A Fire Checklist

2/2/2017 (Permalink)

After a Fire Checklist The following checklist serves as a quick reference and guide for you to follow after a fire strikes.



  • Contact your local disaster relief service, such as The Red Cross, if you need temporary housing, food and medicines.

  • If you are insured, contact your insurance company for detailed instructions on protecting the property, conducting inventory and contacting fire damage restoration companies. If you are not insured, try contacting private organizations for aid and assistance.

  • Check with the fire department to make sure your residence is safe to enter. Be watchful of any structural damage caused by the fire.

  • The fire department should see that utilities are either safe to use or are disconnected before they leave the site. DO NOT attempt to reconnect utilities yourself.

  • Conduct an inventory of damaged property and items. Do not throw away any damaged goods until after an inventory is made.

  • Try to locate valuable documents and records. Refer to information on contacts and the replacement process inside this brochure.

  • If you leave your home, contact the local police department to let them know the site will be unoccupied.

  • Begin saving receipts for any money you spend related to fire loss. The receipts may be needed later by the insurance company and for verifying losses claimed on income tax.

  • Notify your mortgage company of the fire.

  • Check with an accountant or the Internal Revenue Service about special benefits for people recovering from fire loss. Source: United States Fire Administration.

Types Of Smoke

7/18/2016 (Permalink)

Types of Smoke:

  •   Wet Smoke (caused by plastics & rubber)
    o   Low heat, smoldering, pungent odor, sticky, smeary.  Usually produces smoke webs that are more difficult to clean.
  •   Dry Smoke (caused by paper & wood)
    o   Fast burning, high temperatures, heat rises therefore the smoke rises.
  •   Protein Fire Residue (produced by evaporation of material, such as animal fat, rather than from a fire)
    o   Virtually invisible, discolors paints and varnishes, extreme pungent odor.
  •    Fuel Oil Soot (furnace puff backs)
    o   A “puff back” is a misfiring in the furnace that can send soot throughout your home, covering drapes, bedding, furniture, cabinets, walls, and everything in between. While “puff backs” can create havoc for the homeowner, SERVPRO® of Salem, Peabody, Marblehead can, in most cases, restore the contents and structure quickly.
  •    Other Types (tear gas, fingerprint powder, and fire extinguisher residue)

SERVPRO® of Salem, Peabody, Marblehead professionals are trained to handle your toughest losses.

Before you risk doing further damage by attempting to clean up the damage yourself, call the smoke damage cleanup and restoration professionals:

 SERVPRO® of Salem, Peabody, Marblehead at 978-744-4545

 24 hours per day / 7 days per week